Tips to Make New Friends

Making new friends can be intimidating, but it’s definitely rewarding. After all, friends form a big part of our life for most of us. They are the ones who walk through life together, share our ups and downs, and pains and joys. Without friends, life wouldn’t be the same at all. We wouldn’t be who we are if not for them.

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If you are looking to make new friends, you have to get clear on what kind of friends you want to make. Broadly speaking, there are 3 types of friends:

“Hi-Bye” friends (or acquaintances). These are the ones you see at school/work because the context calls for it. You say hi when you see each other and you say bye at the end of the day, but that’s about it. The relationship never lasts when the context is removed, i.e. when you graduate from school or leave the workplace.
Regular friends. Social, activity buddies you meet up every now and then to catch up or hang out with. You can generally talk about regular topics under the sun.
True, soul friends (or best friends). People you can talk anything and everything with. You may or may not meet up every day, but it doesn’t matter as the strength of your friendship is not determined by how frequently you meet up — it’s more than that. These are the jasminelive friends you can trust to be there for you whenever you need them, and they will go the extra mile for you.

Most of us are looking to make regular friends and if possible, true, soul friends. We probably have a lot of hi-bye friends — more than we can count. The ratio of my hi-bye friends, normal friends, and true, soul friends is about 60-30-10%. Over the years as I meet more and more people, it has become more like 75-20-5%. I suspect it’s about the same for other people too, with a variance of about 5-10%.

No matter whether you just want to make normal or best friends, you can do that. You may not believe it, but I was a very quiet and secluded girl back during my primary and secondary school years. When I was in junior college, I maintained this seclusive lifestyle, though I began to speak up more. Entering university and later on P&G (my ex-company) made me more sociable. Today I run my blog and coach others through 1-1 coaching and workshops where I share a lot of my life to others. If the younger me had wondered what I would be like in the future, I wouldn’t never have thought that I would be as outward and expressive as I am today.

If you take a look at the people out there who seem to make friends easily, they were probably seclusive themselves at some liveprivates point. Their social skills were likely all picked up over time. For this same reason, you can learn to become more sociable through time and practice.